Propeller Safety

Back up to Risk & Safety

Propeller injury is the most likely cause for serious injury in paramotor. Maybe even more than other accident types it’s under-reported. I know that from travels where pilots either tell me of one they saw, heard about, or had happen, and it never got reported.

Experienced pilots seem to be at least as susceptible. There are increasingly clever ways to mitigate the risk which is part of what this category is intended to share. The book includes the best of these but more detail is possible here. Accident reports that involve prop injury will also be included in this category.


Where Paramotor Propeller Injuries Happen

Body contact with a spinning prop remains the most likely cause of serious paramotor injury and it can happen in unexpected ways. Here are some examples. Reducing these accidents starts with awareness, and it’s is a good sign that you care enough to learn. Limbs...

Safer Starting Stand for Paramotor

Passive starting safety for paramotor pilots, thanks to Randy Bridge It’s inspiring to see pilots making this sport safer while realizing that choices will be made. Such was the case of Randy Bridge who implemented an idea that will work with essentially any...

Prop Stopper and Prop Protector

Pap has a cool idea for their clutched machines. It was probably made to prevent the prop from free spinning during transport, but it can also provide some protection during start. Just like the “Rope Trick,” leave the prop cover on while starting. If the...

Rope Trick I: Paramotor Prop Stopper

For clutch equipped machines | Rope Trick II another version As we’ve covered, props eat body parts on a regular basis. Clutched machines are no better since, although the prop may not spin at idle, it sure spins up fast at throttle-up. Further, the fact that a...

Safety: Prop Injuries to Legs and Starting

You wouldn’t think this could happen. During launch the pilot somehow got his calf muscle into the prop while making large strides. As of Sept, 2007, I know of two similar incidents. The only solution to this is make sure your machine doesn’t allow it. Is...

A Better Paramotor

Safer machines for the real world. Updated Apr 22, 2015 to add brake toggles/prop protection Yes, they have to be fun, comfortable, light, powerful, look cool and be convenient. The most talented designers will accomplish all that and provide decent protection. No,...

Paramotor Propeller Safety

Hardware Improvements Here is a centralized location to learn all about the causes and cures of our sport’s most likely serious injuries: body contact with spinning prop. It is broken down into several sections to ease the search. There are a number of hardware...

SafeStart Tested

Passive starting safety for paramotor pilots I mounted it to my Miniplane Top 80 and it’s working. Unfortunately, the motor’s idle must stay below 2700 RPM which may be a problem for pilots who frequently have their motors go above that RPM causing false...

A Better Throttle

Safer gear is an important element to reducing injuries. | A Better Paramotor | Safety Ring Retrofit | A Better Cart Another major improvement to safety can likely be realized with a simple throttle change. Most of the injuries happen while a pilot, facing his motor,...

Paramotor Safety Improvements

Here are some things observations of positive developments in paramotor safety. It would be cool for every machine to provide basic protections against the inevitable: falling, unexpected thrusting, and others. Check out A Better Paramotor. Here is a celebration of...

A Better Paramotor: Quick Shutoff

Passive and Active safety to help shut off the motor if necessary | Safestart Ken Morrison Emergency Shut Off Here is an idea for reducing the possibility of a motor leaping forward and into an unsuspecting pilot. It incorporates two frame-mounted switches. One for...